Lois Reynolds Mead

Art and a pink monkeyflower in a native plant garden…

The art of…

6 Comments

There is something to be said for being a hanger-on…a tag-a-long…a just-along-for-the-ride kind of person. Having an older brother, I was trained at an early age for this role. In this picture you can tell that I hung away from the group on the bird watching excursion to Lake Merritt last week.

IMG_9546

My role does not necessitate much equipment…no binocs and no scopes to carry (although those who have them are very gracious about letting me share if I wish to). No notebook and pen. Just armed with my iPhone stuffed in my pocket. Not keeping a list and trying to increase it leaves me free to notice supporting characters in the scenery drama. Don’t get me wrong…I can immediately identify an oystercatcher. I know when it is a Red-tail Hawk soaring (as long as the light is behind him and illuminating his tail). I’ve got the difference between Night Herons, Great Blue Herons and Egrets. Canada Geese are a piece of cake. Greater and Lesser Scaup, not so much. I pride myself on my other skills…I can easily distinguish for you the difference between violet, red-violet, and blue-violet which I am sure TM cannot (not fair, really, because he is color blind…I think he must identify birds based on shape and pattern). My strengths lie elsewhere. and I know it, so I do not hyper focus only on the birds leaving me the time to notice the other components of the environment. In this case, it was the trees that line the bank of Lake Merritt. I do not know what their name is, but I think their shapes and textures are exhilarating and I had fun photographing them along with a few flowers who were performing in their role as early arrivals for the spring that is to come.

IMG_9626 IMG_9625 IMG_9633

IMG_9590 IMG_9591 IMG_9593

IMG_9635

IMG_9589 IMG_9562

IMG_9621

As TM does his bird field trips, I will continue to develop my skills in the art of being an observer-tag-along from just to the side, having my own kind of fun…

p.s. The trees may be coastal tea trees native to Australia.

Author: loisreynoldsmead

artist

6 thoughts on “The art of…

  1. That tree is gnarlier than all get out! 🙂 And the flowers are pretty sight! Cheerz, Uncle Tree

  2. Beautiful photos and those twisty trees are fabulous!

  3. The photos you captured of these trees are purely breath-taking — It makes me wonder how long it took to twirl their roots that way, how old they are etc — Stunning — I realize your bird watching tour was much more than a nature walk, but nothing else compares viewing the world at its best!
    ~Kristine

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s